Prolapsed Rectum in Ferrets

The opinion of vets is that prolapse rectum happens when very young ferrets are put on a hard kibble diet too soon πŸ™

Some ferrets with diarrhea will strain until the soft pink lining of the rectum gets pushed through the anal opening. This tends to happen mostly with young ferrets suffering from proliferative colitis and you should take your ferret to the vet immediately.

A prolapsed rectum which occurs without diarrhea is not something to worry about, unless the ferret starts chewing the prolapse.

It will usually disappear within a day or two but if you’re concerned, please take your fuzzball to the vet.

This advice is from Miami Ferret …

“When there is nothing firm for the colon to push against (such as firm stool), the rectum may be pushed out. If the ferret checks out medically, then treat symptomatically by applying a cream of Preparation H and 0.5% cortisone three times daily and after every bowel movement. One vet recommends Anusol HC-1. It combines the cortisone into the meds. In severe, recurring cases, a purse string suture may be needed.”

 


Here are a couple of photos of a ferret with a prolapsed rectum …


More information about Prolapsed Rectum in Ferrets can be found on the following sites …

Prolapsed Rectum by Judith A Bell, DVM, PhD

Protrusion of the Rectum and Anus in Ferrets (PetMD)

Why Ferrets Get Red Behinds by Rene C Gandolfi, DVM, DABVP (SmallAnimalChannel.com)

 

 

(Last updated October 2015)

 

 


DISCLAIMER: The information contained on this page is not meant to replace seeing a veterinarian if you think your ferret is ill. It’s only meant to supply general information on a particular illness which was obtained either from personal experience with my sick ferrets, or from books and/or the Internet.



Comments

Prolapsed Rectum in Ferrets — 4 Comments

  1. My ferrets butt is really swollan and red. Almost looks inside out. He crys almost while using the bathroom and I’ve noticed he’ll sometimes push and nothing comes. He strains and I can tell he is in pai . What can I do to help him or any ointments I can put on his rear end? Trying to avoid the vet if possible I need help fast

  2. Alexis, I really think you need to take your baby to the vet because things will only get worse for him if you leave it. This is what PetMD say about treatment ….
    If your ferret has a concurrent bacterial or viral infection, or a parasitic infestation, your veterinarian will need to treat it first with an appropriate antibiotic or anti-parasitic drug. Once the underlying cause of the prolapse has been identified and treated, your veterinarian will first need to decrease the swelling and return the displaced tissue to its proper location inside the ferret’s anus.
    Only the vet will be able to diagnose what the cause of your ferret’s prolapsed rectum.
    For your ferret’s sake, PLEASE don’t avoid the vet πŸ™

  3. My ferrets anus is red on the bottom, I just took her off some antibiotic medication and she’s on another medication which is a steroid…. but I just changed her food diet to this new cat food. I just went to the vet and can’t pay to go again, I’m worried about her, some of her poops are solid, some of them aren’t… but it obviously hurts her because she doesn’t like when it’s touched. I don’t know what to do… I want her to feel better. It’s not super swollen only alittle swollen.

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  4. Hi Kirstie
    I’m not a vet so am not able to give you any medical advice about your poor girl πŸ™
    You said you got new cat food for her – is it kibble (dry food)?
    I have never had a problem like a prolapsed rectum with any of my ferrets but I would *think* that it might be a good idea to put her on soft food until her bottom heals. Don’t get cheap (wet) cat food from the supermarket – look to see what would be good for her at a decent pet store.
    And this suggestion from the PetMD site about the problem : “If your ferret has a concurrent bacterial or viral infection, or a parasitic infestation, your veterinarian will need to treat it first with an appropriate antibiotic or anti-parasitic drug. Once the underlying cause of the prolapse has been identified and treated, your veterinarian will first need to decrease the swelling and return the displaced tissue to its proper location inside the ferret’s anus. This may be done manually by performing a gentle massage on the area, or by using lubricating gels or topical agents (e.g., a 50 percent dextrose solution), which aids in the reduction of the swelling.”
    As I said, never having had this problem with any of my ferrets, I honestly don’t know what advice to give you. Everything I said might be the wrong thing to do for your girl so I wish you would take her to your vet for proper treatment!
    Good luck and hugs to your little girl from her new buddies down under!
    Cheers
    ~Nona

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